Symposeum graphic

Unfolding Argyll's Archaeological Story:

A Regional Archaeological Research Framework for Argyll

 

The archaeological sites in Argyll are among the most important monuments in Scotland and there has been a history of archaeological research here since the 17th century.

The symposium took place on the 27th and 28th of November 2015 and brought together all those currently researching the archaeology and history of Argyll to examine and discuss the area’s current archaeological knowledge base. We identified work undertaken, knowledge gaps, ideas as to how we should fill those gaps and areas of shared research interest. Further down this page, you will find the papers that were created specifically for the symposium.

 

A Regional Archaeological Research Framework for Argyll - RARFA

Since the symposium, we have been working with a team of experts to produce an Archaeological Research Framework for Argyll. The research framework will be an ‘organic’ online resource for all to use and will feed into the Scottish Archaeological Research Framework(ScARF). It will be a dynamic and flexible document which can be added to and updated over time.

We plan to publish the Research Framework document in March 2017.

A copy of the draft framework document is currently available for download here.

If you would more information, please email us at events@kilmartin.org.

Unfolding Argyll’s Archaeological Story was funded by Historic Environment Scotland, Museums Galleries Scotland, Argyll and Bute Council, Scottish Archaeological Research Framework(ScARF) and the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.

Ongoing work to produce the Archaeological Research Framework for Argyll is funded by the Scottish Archaeological Research Framework(ScARF) and the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.

 

Symposium Papers

The invited speakers (champions) produced papers in advance of the symposium.

These documents were written for the purpose of the symposium only. They are not for general distribution or citation. We are very grateful to the speakers for giving their permission for these papers to be available online.

In addition to the symposium papers, summaries are provided which provide a useful ‘at-a-glance’ outline of each period discussed.

 

Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Argyll
Title: The Early Prehistory of Argyll
Professor Steven Mithen
Period Summary

 

Bronzeage beaker

Neolithic and Bronze Age Argyll
Title: The Neolithic, Chalcolithic and Bronze Age in Argyll-Part 1
Dr Alison Sheridan
Period Summary

 

balure dun north knapdale

Iron Age Argyll
Title: Iron Age Argyll
Roddy Regan
Period Summary

 

Loch Glashan Brooch

Early Medieval Argyll
Title: Early Medieval Argyll
Dr Ewan Campbell and Colleen Batey
Period Summary

 

Argyll Medieval

Medieval Argyll
Title: The Archaeology of Medieval Argyll
Dr John A Raven
Period Summary

 

Kilmory Township Image

Early Modern Argyll
Title: Early Modern Period (1600 - 1900) and Modern
Dr Heather James
Period Summary

 

Symposium Notes

The Scottish Archaeological Research Framework (ScARF) project sponsored students from the University of Glasgow to take notes during each session.

Unfolding Argyll’s Archaeological Story: Research Framework Symposium Discussion Notes

 

Additional Talks

The Paleoenvironment of Argyll
Title: Towards an Environmental History of Argyll
Dr Richard Tipping

 

 

Use of Documents

All documents on this page were written for the purpose of the symposium only. They are not for general distribution or citation. We are very grateful to the speakers for giving their permission for these papers to be available online.

Notes are intended as a record of the discussion of each session, and a pointer to potential research questions, rather than as a verbatim record.

 

symposium funder logos

 

 


KILMARTIN MUSEUM - WHERE ARGYLL'S ANCIENT PAST COMES ALIVE

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